Seed Round for Alchohol Delivery App

  

T3 ENDEAVOR CANADA (British Columbia)

  

Blockchain enabled accounting platform

  

LP Opportunity - Phase 1 Resort Development - 67.5% ROI, Monthly Dist.

  

$500,000 - $20,000,000

  

Bridge the Indigenous Digital Divide with Sequorum's 1 Gbps Internet. 10% annual dividends. 605% ROI

  

Funding for real estate

  

Bison, the perfect alternative

  

Big Calm Tiny Homesteads

  

Camper Van Conversion with ACP & Marine Plastic Interior/ Soap friendly recirculating shower

  

Commercial-Scale Cannabis Production Facility (Legacy Health Canada Applicant)

  

Equity Investment Opportunity in Electronic Health Record and Telehealth Platform

  

Projects under way!Last Chance! Joint Venture with principal back in THREE MONTHS and ONGOING INCOME

  

15% ROI bi-annually return on $500K – Silent Investor – Expanding International Wireless Business –

  

DreamPlay - A live streaming platform for gamers. See deck, video, and website

  

Business Partner Wanted

  

Here's an opportunity for you and I.

  

SaaS platform to integrate Canadian housing financial

  

ROI of $3.8MM on $2MM in year 4. 22% average annual return.

  

Communication Corp.

  

Eden Earthworks

  

User-Driven Growth

  

Sustainable Product with Health Benefits and High ROI (46%)

  

Integrated Facility Operations & Supply model positioned for International expansion!

  

MHP Project Development - Vancouver Island

  

Hemp-infused, Alcohol-Free Sparkling Cocktails

  

CO2 recycling service

  

Written guarantee 100% ROI within 12 months on Done-For-You Ecommerce store

  

Hart & Caron Property Management Researching partnership

  

The most unexpected way to avoid being caught cheating.

  

Clear Choice Building Maintaince

  

Social Media App Growth Funding

  

Innovative Existing Product

  

Need money for my invention

  

Share Sale

  

Tiny Home Builder - With orders to fulfill

  

LoveBud Essentials Online Store

  

Invest in Lindsay, Ontario Development Project

  

Purple Puffers

  

Newly Acquired business looking for short term operating loan. Up to 18% APR.

  

 

Canadian Investment Network


Recent Blogs


Pitching Help Desk


Testimonials

"Our small, early-stage company recently signed up for your service. We got numerous inquiries, several of which we are pursuing, and hopefully will find an investor partner as a result. It is almost impossible for young companies to attract investment capital in the current financial climate, but you managed to bring a number of qualified and interested parties to the table. I would recommend your service to any early-stage company seeking capital. Bruce Jones, CFO "
Bruce Jones

 BLOG >> Recent

Successional Change [Permaculture
Posted on July 24, 2015 @ 06:35:00 AM by Paul Meagher

This blog goes into further detail on the 12th permaculture principle that advises us to "Creatively Use and Respond To Change". In my last blog on this principle, I mentioned that ecological succession was one model that permaculture uses to understand change and promised to address this topic in a future blog. The hope is that models of successional change might be useful for understanding change and therefore using and responding to it more creatively.

The topic of ecological succession is huge and I cannot hope to do it justice in this brief blog. My goal is to simply to highlight a few ideas from the ecological succession literature that might be used as a starting point for thinking about how change happens in natural ecosystems. These concepts might prove useful for thinking about how change happens in other contexts, such as business or life in general.

The first concept that I think is useful for thinking about change is the hump diagram below that depicts how forest succession works. This diagram comes from the Wikipedia page on ecological succession.

The diagram is fairly self-explanatory about how forest succession works. All I want to do is point out that the hump diagram at the top used to depict this change encapsulates alot of useful information in a succinct form. It shows that some species have their day in the sun but are eventually replaced or dominated by other species that thrive for awhile before they too are replaced or dominated. Eventually, in a mature ecosystem, one or more species comes to dominate the ecosystem. Note that some species don't completely disappear over time, they just become less dominant in the landscape. The end of this particular sequence has a couple of species dominating with a couple of other species doing quite well (one appearing to rebound a bit) and one just hanging on. So succession doesn't necessarily involve completely replacing one species with another. It mostly involves changes in which species become dominant over time.

So the diagram gives us a way to think about what succession looks like over time but it doesn't give us much in the way of tools for thinking about why succession has this form. So the second set of concepts I want to discuss are some of the mechanisms that drive this succession.

One mechanism is called faciliation which is the idea that some species prepare the ground for later species. For example, the early species that emerge after a distrubance, the pioneer species, are often nitrogen fixers that cover the ground and help to retain moisture in the ground. This moisture and nitrogen provides an environment for later species to enter and become dominant.

Another mechanism is inhibition which is the idea that some species become dominant by shading out or releasing alleopathic chemicals that cause existing species to become less dominant or die off.

Another mechanism is symbiosis where, for example, a nitrogen fixing tree helps another tree to grow while also benefitting from the moisture, wind protection, root exudates, or mycelial network associated with adjacent trees. One tree may appear dominant, but if the surrounding non-dominant trees were removed, the dominant tree might do less well or die off. This phenomenon is often observed in suburban developments where a few trees are spared but do less well as singular trees.

To conclude, this blog offers up some ideas for how to think about sucessional change in natural ecosystem - what it looks like when it is graphed, and some of the mechanisms that might be used to explain the humps in that graph over time. In permaculture we try to use this knowledge to accelerate successional change in our cultivated systems (e.g., gardens, orchards, forests). Perhaps these concepts might also be useful for thinking about how your products, services, or business might need to evolve over time to become dominant or co-exist successfully in a business ecosystem.

Permalink 

 Archive 
 

Archive


 July 2021 [1]
 June 2021 [1]
 May 2021 [2]
 April 2021 [3]
 March 2021 [3]
 February 2021 [1]
 January 2021 [1]
 December 2020 [1]
 November 2020 [1]
 June 2020 [3]
 May 2020 [1]
 April 2020 [2]
 March 2020 [1]
 February 2020 [1]
 January 2020 [1]
 December 2019 [1]
 November 2019 [2]
 October 2019 [2]
 September 2019 [1]
 July 2019 [1]
 June 2019 [2]
 May 2019 [3]
 April 2019 [5]
 March 2019 [4]
 February 2019 [3]
 January 2019 [3]
 December 2018 [4]
 November 2018 [2]
 September 2018 [2]
 August 2018 [1]
 July 2018 [1]
 June 2018 [1]
 May 2018 [5]
 April 2018 [4]
 March 2018 [2]
 February 2018 [4]
 January 2018 [4]
 December 2017 [2]
 November 2017 [6]
 October 2017 [6]
 September 2017 [6]
 August 2017 [2]
 July 2017 [2]
 June 2017 [5]
 May 2017 [7]
 April 2017 [6]
 March 2017 [8]
 February 2017 [7]
 January 2017 [9]
 December 2016 [7]
 November 2016 [7]
 October 2016 [5]
 September 2016 [5]
 August 2016 [4]
 July 2016 [6]
 June 2016 [5]
 May 2016 [10]
 April 2016 [12]
 March 2016 [10]
 February 2016 [11]
 January 2016 [12]
 December 2015 [6]
 November 2015 [8]
 October 2015 [12]
 September 2015 [10]
 August 2015 [14]
 July 2015 [9]
 June 2015 [9]
 May 2015 [10]
 April 2015 [9]
 March 2015 [9]
 February 2015 [8]
 January 2015 [5]
 December 2014 [11]
 November 2014 [10]
 October 2014 [10]
 September 2014 [8]
 August 2014 [7]
 July 2014 [6]
 June 2014 [7]
 May 2014 [6]
 April 2014 [3]
 March 2014 [8]
 February 2014 [6]
 January 2014 [5]
 December 2013 [5]
 November 2013 [3]
 October 2013 [4]
 September 2013 [11]
 August 2013 [4]
 July 2013 [8]
 June 2013 [10]
 May 2013 [14]
 April 2013 [12]
 March 2013 [11]
 February 2013 [19]
 January 2013 [20]
 December 2012 [5]
 November 2012 [1]
 October 2012 [3]
 September 2012 [1]
 August 2012 [1]
 July 2012 [1]
 June 2012 [2]


Categories


 Agriculture [74]
 Bayesian Inference [14]
 Books [15]
 Business Models [24]
 Causal Inference [2]
 Creativity [7]
 Decision Making [17]
 Decision Trees [8]
 Definitions [1]
 Design [37]
 Eco-Green [4]
 Economics [12]
 Education [10]
 Energy [0]
 Entrepreneurship [68]
 Events [2]
 Farming [20]
 Finance [25]
 Future [15]
 Growth [19]
 Investing [25]
 Lean Startup [10]
 Leisure [5]
 Lens Model [9]
 Making [1]
 Management [9]
 Motivation [3]
 Nature [22]
 Patents & Trademarks [1]
 Permaculture [36]
 Psychology [2]
 Real Estate [3]
 Robots [1]
 Selling [12]
 Site News [17]
 Startups [12]
 Statistics [3]
 Systems Thinking [3]
 Trends [9]
 Useful Links [3]
 Valuation [1]
 Venture Capital [5]
 Video [2]
 Writing [2]